Reesor

Introduction

Town site photo

The Reesor Cemetery

©Copyright: Jeri Danyleyko

Reesor, located in Cochrane District, was first settled around 1925. It was established as a small community for Mennonite refugees from Europe and was named for Thomas Reesor, a Mennonite minister, who was both their benefactor and sponsor.

Besides the Mennonites, the area was also home to a small number of French Canadians. A small local council of sorts was formed between the two groups.

By the 1930s, Reesor included a school, freight station, a store, lumber yard, blacksmith shop, garage, and pool hall. A Mennonite church and cemetery were added in 1932. At its peak, Reesor contained over 100 residents, and supported an additional 100 residents from the surrounding farmlands.

Reesor continued to thrive and grow throughout the depression. Ironically its decline didn't begin until the 1940s, when businesses gradually began to trickle away. The downward slide continued throughout the 50s and 60s.

Reesor lasted until the 1970s. By then all the businesses were closed and many of the farms were closed. Today all that remains are a few ruins, a handful of newer homes, and the cemetery, which is still well maintained.

Created: March 5, 2005, Last Revision: February 24, 2014
Research: Yvan Charbonneau
Content: © Copyright Yvan Charbonneau, all rights reserved.