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Mountain Park...2

Although the coal fields were first developed in 1911, it was not until the mid 1920s when the British controlled company saw any profit. The company had to build a costly railroad to the site; battle the hostile elements and geography, and face continued labor unrest. By the end of the Second World War, the mine encountered a new foe - diesel fuel. Demand for the coal decreased and by the summer of 1950, all operations ceased. The lights were turned off in the alpine community. Most residents cleared out by the fall, and houses and buildings were quickly dismantled. Mountain Park belonged to the ghosts.

Coal hopper bin Coal silo - another view
© Johnnie Bachusky
Above and right: Two views of a portion of Mountain Park’s former strip mine hopper bin or silo, where coal was stored.
© Johnnie Bachusky
Abandoned railway line
Mine ruins
© Johnnie Bachusky
The rail line at Mountain Park is now abandoned and fading; giving over to alpine vegetation
© Johnnie Bachusky
Mining ruins in a nearby creek slowly overcome by nature's forces.
Last ruins of towns' loading dock Pioneer mine building foundation
© Johnnie Bachusky
© Johnnie Bachusky
The last ruins of the town's railway loading dock.
This foundation from a pioneer mine building is one of the few remaining ruins left from Mountain Park’s mine operations.
Railway tracks with pioneer cemetery in background Overgrown railway tracks
© Johnnie Bachusky
© Johnnie Bachusky
The rails in the foreground are part of the "Y" area of the line at Mountain Park, used for the turnaround north to Cadomin and through the Coal Branch. Mountain Park was truly the end of the line for the railway in the Coal Branch.
Rail tracks, now partially overgrown, were once the lifeline between Mountain Park and the rest of the Coal Branch. The pioneer cemetery sits on the small hill in the background.